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The Newsletter

As vaccines continue to be administered the end of the pandemic appears to be at hand. People are resuming normal lives and pent up demand is being unleashed. Consumers are looking forward to a summer filled with travel and congregation with family and friends. Even the Fed is noticing the brighter outlook. The world is opening back up but it probably won’t ever be the same as it was before the Pandemic.

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The Newsletter

Vaccines continue to be administered and supply will likely open up, even more, starting in April. Consumers have been dreaming of a return to normal and we appear to be at the cusp. The result of vaccination could be an explosion of pent-up demand for hardest-hit industries and a much better second half than people expect. Still, strong demand is putting pressure on supply chains and creating inflationary pressures. Given that stimulus is dependent on a K-shaped recovery, normalization could bring its own economic disruptions.

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The Newsletter

Animal spirits are driving momentum across the economy, especially in capital markets. There’s hundreds of billions of dollars waiting to be invested via vehicles like SPACs. Valuations are extreme, yet they are justified by low interest rates. Meanwhile demand is exceeding supply in industries like semi-conductors, housing and transport. Companies are citing inflationary pressures. But the Fed and Treasury are united behind continued stimulus. “We have the tools to deal with that risk.”

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The Newsletter

Markets went haywire last week thanks (so the story goes) to some retail traders in a Reddit forum led by a man named Roaring Kitty.  It was hard to pay attention to much of anything else in capital markets, but it was also a busy week for earnings. Industrial companies said that demand was “very, very, very strong” and there was an abundance of commentary on price pressures. Jerome Powell isn’t worried though. Game on!

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The Newsletter

Succinct Summary: The US got a new President last week, and the new administration is pledging more stimulus.  The economy continues to chug along though and there are signs of tight capacity in some segments, especially transportation networks. Could additional stimulus lead to higher-than-expected inflation?

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The Newsletter

Succinct Summary: Vaccinations are happening around the US and the world.  It’s been a little slower than hoped but that may be because of the logistical challenges of administering vaccines at long-term care facilities.  We are on the cusp of mass dissemination, and there should be enough capacity to make sure that the population is vaccinated quickly. We’ve lost a year of our lives to COVID but the finish line is (hopefully) in sight. Vaccination should unleash a huge amount of pent up demand. Banks, which started to report this week, have showed that credit performance metrics have been better than anyone dreamed possible in March of 2020. They’re releasing reserves and preparing to return capital to shareholders. Tech spend is also booming.

Something New: We launched a new podcast last week where we discuss the top quotes and ideas from the earnings transcripts we read.  It is now available on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast and Spotify and other podcast platforms. Subscribe and give us a review. We hope to be sending a new episode out every Tuesday. 

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The Newsletter

The Year in Review: 2020 was an unprecedented year and The Transcript covered the economy throughout all of its twists and turns. Even though China was battling Covid in 2019, no one really knew what was in store for all of us in 2020. Technology, capital markets, and housing were three industries that boomed. While the stimulus was integral, the economic hero of 2020 was the US consumer. Optimism is high that 2021 will be a more normal year.

Editor’s Request: This weekly newsletter is made possible by donations from our readers. If you like what you are reading, click here to donate (Our suggested donation: $10 per month). Help us keep The Transcript going.

 

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The Newsletter

Succinct Summary: Capital markets are ending 2020 with a bang thanks in part to last week’s hot IPOs.  Business leaders are feeling confident about 2021 and expect next year’s earnings to exceed 2019’s.  Consumer spending is similarly strong.  Even the housing market is stronger than in ’05.  It’s a K shaped recovery for some industries but a vaccine should unleash pent up demand and high unemployment means that interest rates will stay low for longer. Readers should keep an eye on growing supply chain bottlenecks.  This could be a source of some inflationary pressure.

Editor’s Request: This weekly newsletter is made possible by donations from our readers. If you like what you are reading, click here to donate (Our suggested donation: $10 per month). Help us keep The Transcript going.

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